Seasonal Affective Disorder

Its been a really busy week, so sorry for not updating earlier! Here’s some thought’s about SAD from a Chinese Medicine point of view as promised.

Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD is something I’m already seeing a lot of this year as a result of our disappointingly cold, wet Summer.

As the year closes down, the hours of daylight decrease rapidly and the intensity of the sunlight diminishes too.

It’s a time of year that really does separate people out into two very different responses, both physically and emotionally.

For some of us it’s a time of accelerating, creative, social activity. We look forward to evenings of fires and cosy pubs, pulling on woolly scarves, hats and wellies and settling into finding the perfect sloe gin recipe.

For the rest of us it’s a depressing time of short, muddy days, with birds migrating, colds and coughs starting in earnest, and the worry of difficult family members all coming together in an overheated room.

SAD syndrome is, of course, in the latter camp.

This is Yang deficiency in Chinese Medicine. It’s a lack of the natural, warm, dry, upliftingbright energy that is Yang in Chinese Medicine.

The thought of losing it for all those months that lie ahead, as well as the subliminal, day shortening messages that tell us it’s going, send us into a downward spiral of de-energised  depression.

Here are some ways of combating it or, at least, lessening its impact.

Daylight simulating bulbs are available which help our senses feel that the sun might still be shining somewhere! Have a look online.

Its also a good time to start going to the gym in the late afternoon or evening, or finding an evening class somewhere warm, well lit and stimulating!

Another helpful thing is to do some preparatory work for the Spring. This could be planting some bulbs in pots or in the garden. I love the scented Narcissi like paper white and Winston Churchill. Hyacinths are good too; in fact all of the lovely, early scented bulbs are good for promising ourselves that the Spring will come and our senses will be woken up again!

Rake up leaves when the weather is at its kindest, and make some compost for the garden. When its cold and wild outside, tuck up and look through some seed catalogues.

Cooking can be good, too. Look through all your cookery books and try out recipes that you haven’t tried before. Especially those for warming, spicy soups, casseroles and slow cooked, root based dishes.

Make a decision to look after yourself this Winter, so when Spring comes, as it will, you’ll be ready for it!

Of course this all still needs to be balanced by earlier nights to give us our increased need for rest at this time of year.

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