How long does it take? Acupuncture for fertility and IVF support.

I thought I’d do a series of thoughts on ‘How long does it take?

This one is thinking about acupuncture and a Chinese medicine approach to fertility and IVFsupport;

As always there are two main things to bear in mind – the first ‘how severe is the problem?’, the second is ‘how long has it been a problem for?’

The answer to both of these questions can hugely influence how much acupuncture andChinese medicine a person might need, to expect to see a difference.

The average number of acupuncture treatments that are estimated to see a definite difference is usually given as five, but sometimes I see amazing results from the first treatment, and sometimes progress is slower.
So saying, I would certainly hope to be seeing some positive changes after five sessions of acupuncture, regardless of the condition.
Sometimes the change might be ‘less pain’, for example with period pain –  or fewer mood swings. Sometimes a woman’s cycle might start becoming more regular of moving towards 28 days. With Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome things depend again on the severity of the condition. It might be a case of trying to initiate a period, shorten a cycle, stabilise blood sugar and control weight gain or just optimise things on the run up to IVF.

If the fertility problem is more in terms of sperm motility or number, then again the aim would be to optimise things over a period of weeks or months. I’ve seen amazing changes in all aspects of  sperm quality after a course of acupuncture along with Chinese medicine lifestyle advice.

With IVF support there are two key points for acupuncture intervention and a lot of research has centred around these two treatments. These times are just before and just after embryo implantation.

If time and finance were real constraints then just these two treatments would be the ones to go for.

In an ideal world most practitioners would aim to see a woman three months before IVF was due. This would give time to give a course of weekly sessions through one complete cycle (if cycles are actually happening of course), and gain enough understanding of the issues involved to aim further treatments at optimal points in the run up to IVF.

Sometimes the acupuncture sessions are particularly helpful in helping a woman or a couple cope with the stress of IVF – particularly with repeat IVF cycles. There are also acupuncture points which are specific to key events, for example for promoting ovulation, increasing blood flow to a healthy, thick womb lining, and gently damping down an adverse immune response toimplantation. There are also acupuncture points specific to helping minimise the risk of miscarriage.

Fertility support and particularly IVF support is an area where conventional Western medicine and Chinese medicine work particularly well together, and acupuncture is often a form of support which is recommended by IVF clinics.

For anyone who might be thinking about really focussing on fertility I’d recommend these things;

Look at your diet –  increase the quality and quantity of fresh vegetables, fruit and fish, decrease the amount of processed food, sugar, alcohol and stimulants.

Finally make that last push to stop smoking.

Check your rubella immunity is up to date.

Start some gentle, regular exercise.

Take steps to reduce stress in your life.

And – of course – I’d recommend acupuncture and Chinese medicine!

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